New Study Suggests SCS Therapy Could Reduce or Stabilise Use of Opioid


Abbott, a multinational corporation that designs, develops, and manufactures SCS systems and treatment options, provided funding for the study.

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Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy may be able to stabilize or reduce Opium Addiction clinical trials market use in chronic pain patients, according to new research.

Abbott, a multinational corporation that designs, develops, and manufactures SCS systems and treatment options, provided funding for the study.

Nearly 5,400 patients' opioid use records were examined by researchers before and after receiving an SCS system implant.
The examination study was introduced at the 2017 North American Neuromodulation Society (NANS) yearly gathering by Ashwini Sharan, head of Practical and Epilepsy Medical procedure at Vickie and Jack Farber Organization for Neuroscience at Jefferson and leader of NANS.

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Sharan stated: These findings are significant because of the epidemic of opioid addiction and abuse and demonstrate that spinal cord stimulation therapy can provide significant benefits to chronic pain sufferers.

"We concluded it may be possible to improve outcomes by offering spinal cord stimulation to our patients earlier, before opioid dependence and addiction can occur," according to these findings.

An implanted device in an SCS system is very similar to a pacemaker in that it provides nerve fibers with low-level electrical energy and interrupts pain signals as they travel to the brain to reduce pain sensation.

Additionally, when compared to patients who used opioids prior to an implant, those who received a successful SCS system had lower or stabilized average daily opioid use.

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